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NATIONAL SOCIETY UNITED STATES
DAUGHTERS OF 1812

MOTTO : Liberty, Fraternity, and Unity

Alabama Charter Chapter

Alabama's largest and oldest, since 1910, chapter

Welcomes You to Visit Alabama

and to Explore the War of 1812 Jackson Trail

The purpose our society is to promote patriotism, to preserve and increase knowledge of the history of the American people by the preservation of documents and relics, the marking of historic spots, the recording of family histories and traditions, the celebration of patriotic anniversaries, teaching and emphasizing the heroic deeds of the civil, military and naval life of those who moulded this government between the close of the American Revolution and the close of the War of 1812, to urge Congress to compile and publish authentic records of men in civil, military and naval service from 1784 to 1815 inclusive, to maintain at National Headquarters a museum and library of memorabilia of the 1784-1815 period. The National Society United State Daughters of 1812 was organized on January 8, 1892 on the anniversary of the Battle of New Orleans

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Meetings

Birmingham, Alabama

Our meetings are held at 11:00 AM on the third Thursday in October, January and May

October 18, 2011- Speaker Susan Lemensis, Past President of the Georgia Society of U.S. Daughters of 1812 and Director of the Daniel Sword Project

Daniel Appling Sword Project- Georgia Daughters have joined with other groups which include the Sons of 1812, the Friends of Archives and History, the National Society Order of Founders and Patriots, Colonial Dames of the Seventeenth Century, First Families of Georgia and the Georgia Society, Sons of the American Revolution to raise funds to raise funds to purchase the Appling Sword from a private antique dealer and place it in the Georgia Capitol Museum. The Appling Sword, an elaborate ceremonial sword, was purchased by the Georgia General Assembly in 1814 to be presented to Daniel Appling, a hero of the War of 1812. Appling, however, died before the sword could be presented and the sword subsequently was lost after it was made part of an exhibition intended to celebrate the 300th. anniversary of the founding of Jamestown. For more information Click

Daniel Appling is known as Georgia's most prominent soldier in the War of 1812. His reputation stems from an action at the Battle of Sandy Creek on Lake Ontario in upstate New York in 1814. There Appling's command of around 130 riflemen and a similar number of Oneida Indians ambushed and force of 200 British marines and prevented them from seizing naval stores and guns that the American navy was moving by boat to Sackets Harbor. He later distinguished himself in the Battle for Plattsburgh, New York. He was born in 1787 in Columbia County and died in 1817. Current research indicates that he died in Georgia on March 5, 1817 He had resigned his commission, ten months earlier, on June 01, 1816, three months after he returned to  Fort Mitchell near present day Phoenix City, Alabama where he was granted a furlough which released him from military duties and allowed him to return home..

The place and time of Appling's death has become part of a much repeated mythology invented during the first years of the twentieth century that has Appling dying at Fort Montgomery in Alabama or at what is now Montgomery Alabama. Interested researchers are encouraged to examine the court papers of Daniel Appling's sister Rebecca who inherited his estate in Columbia County, Georgia and unsuccessfully pushed a prize claim for Appling and his men that was ultimately rejected by the U.S. Congress.

 

May 19, 2011 Topic: "Remember the Raisin," Battle fought in Michigan on Jan 23, 1813 Video on the River Raisin Click. Site of new National Park Also See

The River Raisin Battlefield was the site of one of largest engagements during the War of 1812. The battle on January 22, and the massacre on January 23, 1813 was fought here in Monroe Michigan (formally Frenchtown) on the northern shore of the River Raisin. Of 934 Americans who fought here, only 33 escaped death or capture.  The massacre of wounded soldiers the following day shocked and enraged Americans throughout the Old Northwest Territory and "Remember The Raisin" became the battle cry for the War of 1812.

October 18, 2011- Speaker Susan Lemensis, Past President of the Georgia Society of U.S. Daughters of 1812 and Director of the Daniel Sword Project

Daniel Appling Sword Project- Georgia Daughters have joined with other groups which include the Sons of 1812, the Friends of Archives and History, the National Society Order of Founders and Patriots, Colonial Dames of the Seventeenth Century, First Families of Georgia and the Georgia Society, Sons of the American Revolution to raise funds to raise funds to purchase the Appling Sword from a private antique dealer and place it in the Georgia Capitol Museum. The Appling Sword, an elaborate ceremonial sword, was purchased by the Georgia General Assembly in 1814 to be presented to Daniel Appling, a hero of the War of 1812. Appling, however, died before the sword could be presented and the sword subsequently was lost after it was made part of an exhibition intended to celebrate the 300th. anniversary of the founding of Jamestown. For more information Click

Daniel Appling is known as Georgia's most prominent soldier in the War of 1812. His reputation stems from an action at the Battle of Sandy Creek on Lake Ontario in upstate New York in 1814. There Appling's command of around 130 riflemen and a similar number of Oneida Indians ambushed and force of 200 British marines and prevented them from seizing naval stores and guns that the American navy was moving by boat to Sackets Harbor. He later distinguished himself in the Battle for Plattsburgh, New York. He was born in 1787 in Columbia County and died in 1817. Current research indicates that he died in Georgia on March 5, 1817 He had resigned his commission, ten months earlier, on June 01, 1816, three months after he returned to  Fort Mitchell near present day Phoenix City, Alabama where he was granted a furlough which released him from military duties and allowed him to return home..

The place and time of Appling's death has become part of a much repeated mythology invented during the first years of the twentieth century that has Appling dying at Fort Montgomery in Alabama or at what is now Montgomery Alabama. Interested researchers are encouraged to examine the court papers of Daniel Appling's sister Rebecca who inherited his estate in Columbia County, Georgia and unsuccessfully pushed a prize claim for Appling and his men that was ultimately rejected by the U.S. Congress.

 

January 20, 2011 Meeting

Speaker: Robert Scott Davis, the Director of theFamily and Regional History Program at
Wallace State College, Hanceville, Alabama who spoke on the War of 1812 and provided our
members with a List of War of 1812 Research Sources.

The October 13 Meeting
Featured Connie H. Grund who reported on trip to Devon, England
Dartmoor Prison and Saint Michael and All Angels Church where
she and Charlotte Slinkard (Past Present of U.S.Daughters of 1812)
visited the American War of 1812 Cemetery, church and prison and
presented the First Sprit of 1812 medal awarded by the
U.S. Daughters of 1812 to Ron Joy.
As prison historian Ron Joy lovingly and patiently preserved
the record of the American prisoners of war who were
imprisoned at Dartmoor during the War of 1812 and
participated in the construction of Saint Michael's Church.

The Spirit of 1812 Award, beginning with this firat, shall be awarded to an individual or to an
organization with a distinguished record of study, promotion and dedication to the preservation
of the history of people, places and events of the War of 1812.


The May 20th.Meeting
at the Birmingham Country Club
Featured Davis Arthur, a Fifth Grade Student from Vestavia
Davis is the U.S. Daughters of 1812 First Place Winner

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Davis read his award-winning essay at our meeting.
His Topic was: The Creek War, A War of 1812 Civil War Which Transformed America.
A copy of his speech is available under Chapter Programs

At this meeting we heard reports from members who attended the U.S.Daughters Associate Council Meeting, April 8-11, in Washington, D.C. and viewed Photos of this meeting and the Dedication of graves in the Congressional Cemetery in Washington of our 1812 founder Flora Darling and of Chief Pushmata, the Choctaw leader whom Andrew Jackson himself described "as our most loyal Indian ally." Expect to see some of these on this web site soon.

Our October Program on Thursday, October 29th.

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Speaker Kathryn Penton (left) shown with Chapter President Carolyn Drennen

Kathryn Madison Penton
spoke on the archaelological dig at Montpelier,
the home of President James Madison and his wife Dollie.
Ms. Penton is a descendant of William Madison, brother of James Madison.

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Officers

PRESIDENT
CAROLYN DRENNEN
FIRST VICE PRESIDENT
LINDA WILLIAMS SHABO
CHAPLAIN
GAIL PUGH
RECORDING SECRETARY
HELEN THRASHER
CORRESPONDING SECRETARY
LAURA RAMSAY
TREASURER
LANELL SAEGER
REGISTRAR
JEANETTE "JYL" HARDY
HISTORIAN
REITA REID
LIBRARIAN
GLOICE PRUITT
PARLIAMENTARIAN
SANDRA FOX

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Alabama Charter Chapter Members
Serving the National Society

SHELBY DEAN WARD
Honorary President National
CLAIRE "COOKIE" DOROUGH
Honorary Vice President National
CAROLE McADAMS THOMAS
3rd. Vice President National
CAROLYN DRENNEN, Chairman National
Headquarters Endowment Trust Fund
CONNIE GRUND Chairman National
Preservation St Michael and All Angels' Church
LINDA W. SHABO
Public Relations Chairman National

For More Information Email Chapter President or Contact Chapter Registrar
U.S. Daughters of 1812 Nation Web Site Link

Web hyperlinks to non – National Society of the United States Daughters of 1812 are not the responsibility of the
National Society United States Daughters of 1812, the StateOrganizations or individual 1812 chapters.

The 1812 insignia is the property of, and is copyrighted by the National Society of the U.S.D. of 1812.

Date Created and Listed on U.S. D. of 1812 Web Site: October 2nd., 2009; updated last on 28 September, 2011
For more information re. this web site, Email Web Master

 

Daughters War 1812